Postpartum Depression and Baby Blues

By:  On:  February 23, 2018 9:30 AM

Some of the emotions of baby blues can overlap with postpartum depression for example, all new mothers cry. But if you cry all day, for many days, and are unable to function because you are crying too much then you need help.

It’s not what you are feeling, necessarily. It’s how often you feel it, how long you have been feeling this way, and how much it impedes your day to day functioning.”

The most important factor to consider is how long you have been feeling this way. “The fundamental difference between the blues and postpartum depression is the timing. If symptoms of distress emerge after (or last longer than) two to three weeks after delivery, it is no longer considered to be baby blues. It’s also important to know that some of the most common symptoms of postpartum depression – persistent anxiety and rage, for example – don’t resemble the stereotype of a lethargic, sadness-filled depression.

Baby Blues

  • You feel like crying all the time, emotional and/or profoundly vulnerable. It can sometimes resemble a very bad PMS.
  • Your symptoms last about two weeks after giving birth.
  •  You also might experience mood instability, depressed mood, sadness, irritability, anxiety, lack of concentration and/or feelings of dependency.

Postpartum Depression

Crying and feel a sense of being overwhelmed for longer than three weeks after delivery.

  • You are unable to function
  • Feel your symptoms of after delivery  are unbearable
  • Are unable to sleep, even though you are exhausted
  • Want to sleep all the time & Are sleeping more than usual
  • Cry continuously
  • Can’t enjoy your baby at all & Don’t want to spend time with your baby
  • Feel afraid of your baby
  • Have a dramatic change in appetite either you begin eating too much or do not feel like eating at all.
  • Are troubled by anxious thoughts about your baby being harmed or in short overthinking
  • Feel intense rage
  • Have a personal or family history of depression or anxiety
  • Withdraw from activities you normally enjoy
  • Feel that you have “gone away” or lost yourself
  • Think about harming yourself
  • Believe your family would be better off without you or that you never should have become a mother